5 Ways Adult Learning is Unique and 7 Tips to Apply it to your Corporate Training

It can be easy to assume that the way individuals take in information is fairly consistent. However, have you ever considered how the dynamics of learning change as we age? Consider the strategies used to teach early elementary students, versus someone in high school. How is the classroom laid out? How is information delivered? What are the expectations of the students to help them learn?

This also carries over to how adults learn. It is called andragogy, and it is the study of how adults learn differently from children. We often associate the majority of our structured learning with our younger years. And while this is true, learning is a life long process that changes overtime, so understanding adult learning theory and its styles is crucial to delivering effective corporate training.

Learn more about adult learning and empower yourself to deliver your training accordingly with our guide to adult learning theory below.

MALCOLM KNOWLES’ 5 ASSUMPTIONS OF ADULT LEARNERS

Adult Learners

While the word andragogy can be traced back to the 1800s, the most popular research and theorizing of it can be traced back to Malcolm Knowles in 1968. Malcolm Knowles was an American adult educator who used scientific methods to determine the most effective ways to teach adults. Through this and his experience teaching at the YMCA and working for the Adult Education Association, he developed four assumptions about how adults learn (he added the fifth assumption several years later). They are:

1. SELF-CONCEPT

As an adult, our experiences give us a stronger self-concept. This helps us better understand our learning needs, style, and preferences. Along with this, as we move further into adulthood, we become less dependent on others, and shift to having a strong sense of independence. This can make it more challenging to sit in a classroom and learn from another instructor. This means that adult learners tend to prefer a more self-directed approach to learning, rather than instructor-led. Furthermore, because of this independence, adults tend to prefer to be involved in the planning and evaluation of their instruction.

2. ADULT LEARNER EXPERIENCE

The experience an adult has already gathered before entering a training workshop through previous education, work experience, and life in general is significantly higher than a child entering a learning environment. Adults have hands-on experience, accumulated knowledge, and have learned from making mistakes. This must be considered when teaching adults, as it can help them make meaningful connections that will help them better retain information. As a trainer, being mindful of the things your adult learners have experienced can help you better engage them.

3. READINESS TO LEARN

As adults, our readiness to learn is most prevalent when the topics resonate with our everyday lives, such as growth or advancement in our career. When there is a strong and relevant reason to learn, adults are significantly more interested in learning. If adult learners can’t see how they can apply what they are learning to their life – whether personally or professionally – they will be significantly less engaged in your workshops. If learning can help them better fit into their roles in society, they will be more likely to value the training they take in.

4. ORIENTATION OF LEARNING

The orientation of adult learning is less focused on content, and more focused on practicality. Adult learners want to learn things that will help them solve problems in their lives or careers. This shift in perspective means that adult learners prefer to take in information that they can immediately apply to better hone their skills, increase productivity, and advance their career and organization wherever relevant. This is also referred to as problem-centered learning rather than content-centered learning.

5. MOTIVATION TO LEARN

A child’s motivation to learn generally comes from the guidance of adults, such as parents, teachers, and mentors. Adult learners generally have a desire to learn based on internal factors. This includes personal reasons such as increasing self esteem or progressing in their workplace. An adult building maturity overtime leads to them better understanding what they need to learn to progress in life, and they will be motivated to train based on that.

TIPS TO SUIT YOUR TRAINING TO ADULT LEARNERS

So what does this mean? And how does it impact your corporate training? Below are our tips for providing corporate training to adults based on Knowles’ Assumptions for Adult Learning:

  1. Ensure you can back up your credibility as a trainer to build trust with your learners. This can help you keep your adult learner’s attention despite their increased independence compared to a child.
  2. Provide self-directed learning options if possible. As a trainer, it may feel like you are losing a sense of control in your training by providing self-directing options. However, for adults it can be just as – if not more – effective, as it better aligns with many adults learning preferences. Self-directed learning can be implemented through eLearning for convenient, instructorless training.
  3. Involve your learners. Adult learners like to feel involved in the learning process. As a trainer, sending notes or agendas ahead of time to your learners about what will be covered in your workshop can help your learners prepare any questions or other topics they would like to see covered when they enter the training. Giving your learners an opportunity to evaluate your training can also give you strong feedback that you can implement in the future and give your learners more of a say in their training.
  4. Encourage your learners to draw on their previous experiences. Take opportunities to let your learners share their experiences and relate them to your training. This could be through group conversations or activities that allow them to reflect on their experience. Being able to share this experience and apply it to your workshops will help the content better resonate with all the learners.
  5. Highlight the benefits and focus on the impact. Being strategic on your promotion and opening of your training workshop can set the tone for how engaged your learners are for your entire workshop, especially when it comes to adult learners. Consider your learner’s wants and needs. Career advancements? Increased professional value? General improvement of soft skills? Make sure you have some of these points ready to communicate to your learners so that they can understand the benefits of your training and how it can help them grow personally or professionally.
  6. Focus on training that can solve problems for your learners. This boils down once again to understanding your trainee’s needs. What challenges or obstacles are they facing that would make your training worth their while? Ensuring these solutions are incorporated into your training will make your workshops truly stand out.
  7. Increase motivation by focusing on the internal impact. Understanding your trainee’s motivation and how motivation is unique to adult learners will help you plan your workshops in a way that will keep your trainees engaged. Make sure your training is relevant to the factors that will motivate your trainees such as advancements in their workplace or personal development.

CONCLUSION

As adults develop more skills and knowledge, their learning style and experience impacts how they best take in information. By referring to adult learning theory and applying it to our training, you can ensure you are providing the best possible corporate training to your learners.

 

Posted by Katelyn Roy on 

Email Templates to Engage Your Trainees

women with envelope

women with envelope

 

 

As a trainer, what are your top priorities? Perhaps it is:

  • Educating clients
  • Consulting clients
  • Helping clients with personal and professional development
  • Helping clients meet their organizational goals

Notice how I didn’t say email marketing? That doesn’t mean it’s not important!

With a vast clientele, effectively communicating with your trainees and prospects is crucial to keeping them engaged and in the loop regarding their corporate training. Whether it is closing prospective trainees, preparing trainees, or requesting feedback, sending clear and effective emails will allow you to accelerate your training/consulting business. Below are our email templates for promoting your corporate training and engaging your trainees.

EMAILS FOR POTENTIAL CLIENTS

Useful for: Sending an introductory point of contact to a potential prospect. This is a good excuse to reach out since they have opted to receive emails from you and is an excellent opportunity to open the door to further discussing their specific training needs.

Subject: How Can I Help You?

Hello (Name),

Are you looking to receive (Topic) training, or provide training to your employees?

Are you struggling to find time to develop your own training programs for your team?

You’re in luck!

With my training programs, you can leave the material and training delivery to me. With options for online and in-person training (if applicable), let me be your go-to for providing effective corporate training

Get in touch with me today to further discuss topics you are interested in training yourself or your team for, and how I can help you meet your training goals.

Kind regards,

(Name, Signature)

EMAILS FOR REGISTERED TRAINEES

Useful for: Confirming registration for your trainees and adequately preparing them for what to expect in their training. Allows you to give your participants an opportunity to ask you any questions to help you as a trainer better prepare for their expectations. Our advertorials included with each workshop kit have messaging that can be used for this style of email. Furthermore, if you would like to facilitate a pre-assessment, this email can be a great opportunity to assign that.

Subject: You’re all registered

Hello (Name),

Thank you for registering for my (topic) Workshop. This email confirms your registration.

This course will help you (Refer to course description from our advertorials).

This training has a pre-assessment that will be use to measure your current understanding of the training topic. Please complete this assessment using the link below and email it back to me by (Deadline).

(LINK)

Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns regarding how the training will be facilitated, or what content will be covered. If there is any way I can assist you in preparing for your training, I am here to help.

Kind regards,

(Name, Signature)

FAQ EMAIL

Useful for: Written by our Sales Executive and training industry expert Seth Rozee, this email template covers logistics regarding your training workshop so participants feel confident and prepared going into their training.

Hello (Name),

Have you’ve got questions or concerns about the upcoming workshop?

We’ve compiled a list of the usual questions surrounding what you can expect at one of our sessions – including tips on how you can get the best out of your time spent with us!

  • What to Expect at the Training:

Attendees can expect an inclusive and welcoming environment where they’ll be encouraged to participate in open and honest discussion on the topic at hand. There will be printed handouts provided along with audio and visual aids to help move the training along.

Any attendees with special needs or different abilities are encouraged to let us know ahead of time and we’ll make every effort possible to insure we accommodate them.

  • How long is the session?

It will be a (FULL DAY / HALF DAY / 90-Min Lunch and Learn) where we’ll tackle the latest info on that day’s topic.

Washroom facilities are provided and we’ll be breaking periodically during the session for refreshment.

  • What’s expected of the Trainer?

Your trainer will be knowledgeable on the subject being taught and open to any and all ideas or questions – in fact if you’ve got anything you’d like us to cover specifically during the classjust reply to this email with your suggestions.

  • What’s expected of me?

We’re just happy you’re joining us! We don’t expect you to be an expert on the subject (yet!) and we’re mindful not everyone is comfortable speaking in a crowd.

Your participation during role playing or group activities is encouraged – but not required.

  • What do I bring?

Just bring yourself!

A positive mental attitude and willingness to participate also helps a lot. Our goal is to provide an exciting and informative session where everyone feels welcome to discuss and be a part of the class.

  • When and Where?

Training Date: ________________

Location: ___________________

Instructor’s name: _________________

Contact info: ______________________

We look forward to meeting you!

(Name/Signature)

WELCOME EMAIL FOR LMS LEARNERS

Useful for: Helping your trainees get situated for online training with the use of an LMS. If you’re using our LMS, this fully customizable email will automatically send to your trainees when they sign up.

Subject: Registration Confirmed (Online Training)

Hello and Welcome to your account on (Application Name).

Please find below your username and a link to set your password below.

Your new username is:

(Recipient Username)

Access your account now:

(Welcome Login URL)

Should you require assistance, you can contact support at (Support Email) or call (Support Phone Number).

Kind regards,

(Organization Name)

EMAILS ASKING FOR FEEDBACK

Useful for: Providing an opportunity for your participants to give feedback after your workshop, so you can make changes for future participants. Giving out a survey or comment card to your trainees via email gives them an opportunity to easily communicate their feedback in a less direct way – which some may be more comfortable with. Keep forms short and simple in length and tone, directly ask for general comments in an email reply or use a survey platform like Survey Monkey and provide a link to a survey.

Subject: Let us know how we did

Hello (name),

You are receiving this email because you have recently participated in the (Name of Course) Workshop.

Thank you for participating in this training, I hope it was informative and helps you work towards meeting your organizational goals.

As a trainer, feedback from participants like you is very important to me. I would really appreciate you taking the time to let me know what you thought of the training.

(Option to insert link to survey)

Kind regards,

(Name, Signature)

OTHER TIPS FOR EMAILING CLIENTS AND PROSPECTS

So you have your templates for your emails, now what? Make sure you customize your templates to your needs and optimize your marketing emails with these tips:

Email Marketing Tips

PROVIDE A CALL TO ACTION

A call to action is a step your readers should want to take after reading your email. Your email copy should inspire whatever action you would like them to make, whether it is registering for a course, providing feedback, or something else. Having a clear call to action on your emails will ensure that they have a purpose and warrant space in your recipient’s inbox. When sending an email to clients, always ask yourself, what is the point? Your “why” should be reflected in your call to action. Your build up to it can be more detailed, but your call to action should be clear and concise.

FOLLOW REGULATIONS REGARDING MARKETING EMAILS

If you use emails in your business, it is crucial you understand and comply with the CAN-SPAM Act. Make sure you review the email spam laws in your region. The laws from the CAN-SPAM Act are established and enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, and protect consumers from spam in their inbox. Be sure to regularly review CAN-SPAM laws to ensure you are following the rules, such as providing a way for your recipients to opt out of receiving your emails. This should be presented as a link somewhere visible in your email. While it may feel disheartening to see people opting out of your emails, it is highly beneficial to do this in the long run because it optimizes your open rates and reduces the amount of people marking your emails as spam.

INCORPORATE PERSONALIZATION

Consider this: is an email with your name in the body/subject line more or less likely to grab your attention? I would be willing to guess that the former is true. People are naturally inclined to be drawn to messaging and communication that is directed toward them. Having personalized emails may be intimidating at first, but there are many ways to easily automate your personalization for your emails through email marketing software such as Constant Contact.

MONITOR ANALYTICS

As someone marketing a service like corporate training, tracking your analytics is very important to measuring the success of your emails and adjusting them accordingly. The most important stats to review are your open rates and click rates to see how many people are actually interacting with your emails. By paying attention to your data, you can see what messaging works and what doesn’t, ensuring you have more success in your future marketing emails.

CONCLUSION

We hope these templates and tips for email marketing your training workshops will help you build a strong clientele. Get a head start on your corporate training content today with our Workshop Training Library.

Posted by Katelyn Roy on 

Your Guide to Trainee Feedback Surveys

IMPROVE FUTURE TRAINING SESSIONS WITH OUR FEEDBACK GUIDE

There’s no doubt that accepting and collecting feedback is important when providing any product or service, and corporate training is no exception.

And while any feedback is crucial, being strategic with how you ask for it can allow you to get the most useful information you can from your participants.

Ask the right questions and get effective feedback from your trainees with our training workshop feedback survey guide below. Copy and paste the most relevant questions into an experience management software like Survey Monkey or simply incorporate it into a feedback request email. Get more email templates for your trainees from one of our recent blog posts.

Remember, research has shown that to get optimal data, you need to consider how long you make your survey. Studies have shown that the longer the survey, the less amount of time your participants spend on answering each individual question. This means it is important to balance your survey to make sure there is enough questions to get all the information you are looking for, while still ensuring that there is a good amount of thought going into how each question is answered. While there is no magic number for how many questions you include in your feedback survey, 5-10 questions is a good rule of thumb.

FEEDBACK: WHY YOUR PARTICIPANTS’ OPINION MATTERS

The opinion of your participants experience in your training programs is highly valuable. Feedback is great for learning purposes, for suggesting improvements, and for inspiring creativity in your training programs. It will also help to determine which ideas are most valued for the company. There are a few different levels of feedback you should be seeking post-training.

Feedback

LEVEL ONE: REACTIONS

The most basic level of evaluation is the participants’ reactions to the training. To gauge this, you should be asking questions such as the following:

  • How did you like the training?
  • How did you like the trainer?
  • How did you feel about the training environment?
  • Did you think the training was useful?
  • Did you feel comfortable?
  • Did you feel as though you had ample opportunities to participate?

Level one questions can be asked in post-training surveys or even in the form of verbal feedback before or after the training session.

Reaction feedback is fairly easy to gather and measure. It should be gathered as close as possible to the desired time period. (For example, if you wanted to measure reactions to the first day of a workshop, you should gather reactionary feedback at the end of the first day).

LEVEL TWO: LEARNING

The next level of evaluation assesses how much the participant actually learned in the training session. It looks at two basic areas which are if trainees learned what we (the trainer) wanted them to learn, and if the training session was the experience participants wanted it to be.

This level is typically measured via tests immediately before and immediately after the training. It is important that these assessments are tied closely to the learning objectives.

Note that this level can be measured on an individual or group level. For example, you could have a verbal group-style quiz, or you could have individual assessments. When assessing group performance, however, make sure that each individual can be evaluated.

Since this level of feedback is very specific to the topic you are training in, we can’t generally tell you what you need to ask. However, with our Soft Skills Library, we provide post tests for each of our Soft Skills courses. This allows you to assess your trainees prior knowledge and what they have learned quickly and easily.

LEVEL THREE: BEHAVIOR

This level of question evaluates how trainees could see themselves applying the learning they took in and how it may have changed their behavior towards the training topic. Key questions for this level may include:

  • How quickly do you feel you can put your knowledge from the training into effect when you go back on the job?
  • Were the skills presented today relevant?
  • How confident do you feel you could correctly implement the skills you learned in the training?
  • Do you feel the training you received today will contribute to positive sustainable change in your workplace?
  • Has your outlook on the training topics discussed today changed?
  • Do you feel that you could confidently share the knowledge you learned in the training session with others?

It can be challenging to evaluate changes at this level, particularly with soft topics like communication and leadership. This is why it is important to develop a well-rounded, accurate evaluation system before training begins. This may need to be evaluated on an ongoing basis in a way that is not intrusive on their daily duties. It may take time for the skills learned in the training to be implemented and impacting their results.

LEVEL FOUR: RESULTS

The final level of evaluation is quantifiable results. This assesses the effect of the training on the person’s environment (their workplace, home, etc.). These questions (like the behaviour questions) may be better to ask a period of time after the training was conducted. Alternatively, you can ask questions that can help you gauge if the trainees can visualize themselves using what they learned in the training to help achieve quantifiable results in their organization.

Consider asking if your trainees can use what they learned to better their metrics in regards to:

  • Number of sales
  • Percentage of customer complaints
  • Timeliness
  • Absenteeism
  • Quality ratings and failures
  • Third-party inspection ratings (such as food and safety)

This is an important level of evaluation, as it is often what high-level executives look for when evaluating the training. They want to know numbers and figures, with proof to back the data up, also known as key performance indicators. This ensures that the goals of the business are being tied into the training.

These evaluation processes should tie in with day-to-day business procedures and not cause a lot of extra work. It is important, however, that the trainee knows what measurements are tied to the training before the training begins. This will help them apply context to the training and achieve better results.

As a final note, be careful of outside factors that can cloud ratings in your quantifiable data. For example, let’s say that you send your salespeople on training and you expect their sales to increase by 5% per month as a result. If the economy crashes two months after the training, your results will be clouded by outside circumstances.

ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER:

Your goals as a trainer will impact the questions you will ask your trainees. This could be in regards to quantifying success, training logistics, knowledge retention or something completely different. Here are some other questions you may want to consider asking when gathering feedback on your training:

  • What is your main goal for taking this training?
  • What was the most useful part of the training?
  • What was your least favorite part of the training? Why was it your least favorite?
  • What are your biggest challenges in your role/organization?
  • Where did you first hear about us?
  • How would you rate the training space?
  • How would you rate the trainer’s delivery of the session?
  • How would you describe your experience of booking/registering for your training?
  • Is there any way we can improve to make our future training sessions better?

CONCLUSION:

We hope that this blog post sparked some inspiration for your next training session. Don’t forget to check out our Soft Skills Library for post-test quizzes on 140 training topics, and let us know of any feedback questions we forgot in the comments below!

Posted by Katelyn Roy on 

Icebreaker Cheat Sheet to Kick off Your Corporate Training

How does trust and comfortability allow for more effective corporate training? Ensuring your participants feel safe and comfortable in their training workshops  allows everyone to feel empowered to express their thoughts and ask questions. This helps everyone being trained better their understanding through meaningful conversations. By creating this environment in your training workshops, you will create an enriching learning experience for all of your participants.

Bu how do we do this? Finding ways to get your participants open to discussions requires some strategy. However, by putting this extra effort in, your participants can be reminded of their commonality of objections for the training they are receiving. One of the best way to do this is through incorporating icebreakers into your training sessions.

Icebreakers are exercises used in training workshops as a warm-up and to build trust and comfortability within a group of participants, typically presented as games or exercises that can be done to help gain a better understanding of the topics being discussed, or simply to give your participants an opportunity to get to know each other better. This can help promote collaboration throughout your workshop, increase engagement, or make your training more light hearted and fun.

Looking to facilitate icebreakers in your training but don’t know where to start? We have you covered. Below is our cheat sheet for your corporate training icebreakers.

Icebreaker Benefits

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE?

Great for: Helping your participants get to know each other with zero materials or preparation, making it an ideal online training Icebreaker with the use of breakout room features. It takes about 10-15 minutes.

Instructions: Divide the meeting participants into groups of four or five people by having them number off. Tell the groups that their assignment is to each identify and share their favorite work activity, favorite work goal, etc.

Next, ask group member to share why the selected item is their personal favorite.

Debrief the activity in the large group by asking each individual to share their favorite, but not the “why” with the larger group. This moves quickly.

Lastly, ask participants to share with the larger group what they learned about their fellow group members during the small group discussion.

TEAM TRINKETS

Great for: Getting participants comfortable with conflict resolution in a low-stakes context. This activity will help participants get to know each other while doing a non-conflict laden task. It requires some basic materials such as a flip chart, paper, colored markers, craft supplies, etc.

Instructions:
 Ask participants to number off to create groups of six to eight. Their task is to come up with a team name and slogan, preferably based on something that they all have in common. They should then create two of the following items:

  • Name cards for each participant
  • Team sign
  • Team hats
  • Team work area
  • Team song/poem

Give participants about ten minutes for this task. If conducting training online, put participants into breakout rooms and modify the list to just items that have options that don’t require supplies (just the name, slogan, and song/poem).

After all groups have completed the task, ask each group to present their team name, slogan, and items, and to explain how they arrived at a decision for each. Ask participants if conflicts arose over choices, and how those conflicts were managed.

Encourage groups to work together throughout the day and strengthen their bond.

FIND THE LEADER

Great for: Helping participants get to know each other. Only requires enough chairs for all participants minus one, arranged in a circle. This icebreaker is most ideal for in-person training.

Instructions: Identify the person in the group whose birthday is closest to today’s date. Identify that person as Spot and ask them to leave the room. Then, have the remaining participants choose a leader from the circle. Explain that when Spot returns to the room, they will have three guesses to name the leader. The group’s job is to ensure that their leader stays a secret. Bring Spot back to the room and give him/her three chances to identify the leader. If they succeed, the leader will become the new Spot. If they fail, they will stay as Spot for another round. This activity works best with a group of 10-20 participants, and no one should be Spot for more than three rounds.

Use the following questions to debrief:

  • How did you keep the leader a secret?
  • How did Spot guess the leader?
  • How difficult was it to be Spot?
  • How difficult was it to be the leader?
  • What can we take away from this exercise?

CATEGORIES

Great for: Helping participants get to know each other. Requires no materials. Can be done in person, or modified to be done online with the hand raise feature.

Instructions: Prepare a list of categories, such as:

  • Favorite color
  • Favorite season
  • Number of siblings
  • Astrological sign
  • Shoe size
  • Favorite subject in school

Ask participants to stand. Say that you are going to ask them to arrange themselves by different categories. For example, you might say, “What is your favorite color?” Participants will look for other people who share their favorite color and form groups. Once everyone is in a group, ask the groups to identify themselves. Repeat the activity with four or five different categories.

GETTING ENGAGED

Great for: This activity will help the group to get to know one another, and to connect to each other by working on a common goal that they can refer to throughout the workshop. It requires minimal materials such as flip chart paper and markers, but could easily be modified to suit online training.

Instructions: Have everyone introduce themselves by stating their name, where they are working, how long they have been in their current role, and one thing that they love about the work they do.

Form the group into smaller teams of four to six people. Each group must come up with the name, logo, and motto (if time allows) for their newly formed HR consulting company. They can capture the information on flip chart paper, or simply communicate it verbally if doing the activity online.

BALL TOSS

Great for: Helping participants get to know each other. It requires only a small, lightweight ball that you can easily toss around the room, like a NERF ball.

Instructions: Toss a ball to one of the students who then makes the first introduction and shares one interesting fact about himself or herself. He or she then throws the ball to someone else. Challenge the group to complete the introductions without throwing the ball to the same person twice. If facilitating the icebreaker online, participants can simply choose the person to go next rather than throwing a ball.

FIVE ADJECTIVES

Great for: Helping participants build relationships with each other. Requires no preparation and only paper and pens, and can be modified to online training.

Instructions: Divide the meeting participants into groups of three or four (depending on the number of participants). Breakout rooms can be used if facilitating online. Explain to the groups that each person must write down five adjectives that describe how they view themselves emotionally. Each participant will have a chance to present his / her adjectives to the group.=

Bring the smaller groups together to form the larger group and ask three or four participants to share their adjectives. Note the similarities and differences between how the participants view themselves.

This teambuilding icebreaker takes 10 – 15 minutes, depending on the number of groups.

GROUP RÉSUMÉ

Great for: Getting participants acquainted with each other and promote positive conversation.

Requires little to no materials and can be easily modified for online training using breakout room features.

Instructions: Ask participants to create a composite résumé for their group. They might include such things as:

  • Total years of experience
  • Education
  • Skills
  • Positions held
  • Outside interests

Ask each group to present its résumé to the rest of the participants.

HOUSE OF CARDS

Great for: Helping identify participants’ goals for the training session. Since this icebreaker requires the use of playing cards, it is more appropriate to facilitate this icebreaker at an in-person training session.

Instructions: Pass out one playing card to each participant, face-down. On your cue, ask participants to turn over their playing cards. They are to find others with their suit, but they are not allowed to talk or show their card. For example, if a person had a spade, they may illustrate that by pretending to dig a hole. Once participants are in their groups, they are to introduce themselves and come up with a list of five things that they would like to learn during the workshop. Once groups have created their list, bring participants back together. Have each group present their list and combine topics on the flip chart. Use this as a guide during the workshop. If there are any topics that will not be covered, let participants know where they can find more resources.

CONCLUSION

Icebreakers are an actionable way to meet objectives that will set the ideal tone for the remainder of your training workshops. Our on-line training materials provide everything you need to deliver effective corporate training, including plenty of icebreakers that you can follow to a tee or customize to better suit the context of your organization and your training workshop.

 

Posted by Katelyn Roy on 

Your Quick Guide to Measuring Results from Your Training Workshops

Measuring Results From Training

How much time do you spend leadingMeasuring Results From Training up to your training workshops preparing for them?

Hopefully, you have fast-tracked your training with our white-label materials to save hundreds of hours of time by not writing your training content from scratch. You have prepared, practiced, and delivered your training. You are probably feeling pretty happy with how it went.

But how do we quantify the success of our training? What does it mean to implement successful corporate training? Knowing how to analyze and evaluate your training workshops ensures you can be strategic with how you implement corporate training in the future.

WAYS TO MEASURE RESULTS FROM TRAINING

There are various different ways to measure the effectiveness of your training. These include:

  • Quizzes and tests – Testing helps identify gaps in knowledge which allows you to clarify what needs to be reviewed and covered in more detail for future workshops.
  • Self-analysis or supervisor analysis – Evaluation from different perspectives can show you the multifaceted impact training can have from an internal and external perspective.
  • Metrics tracking – Numbers are a clear-cut way to find a correlation between your training and how it is contributing to your bottom line.
  • Workplace observation – A more qualitative way to measure training results, observing shifts in the workplace post-training in regards to productivity and workplace morale is highly valuable to track.

 

Measure Training Results

Remember, post-workshop evaluations should be:

  • Easy to complete
  • Effective
  • Not time consuming
  • Measurable
  • Consistent
  • As objective as possible

QUANTITATIVE VS. QUALITATIVE RESULTS

Although we all know that training can have many amazing benefits, sometimes it can be hard to prove those benefits and attach a dollar value to training. Some topics, like sales training or time management, might have direct, tangible benefits. Other topics, like communication or leadership, might have benefits that you can’t put a dollar value on. Fortunately, there are various different ways to evaluate training progress to demonstrate its effectiveness.

Training is a significant investment going into your organization. Because of this, it is important to analyze the payback from it. In some cases, this may be easy – you may be able to see a drop in hard numbers (like product defects, customer complaints, or days absent) as a result of your training. In other cases, the benefit might involve something much harder to calculate, like reduced stress, improved teamwork, or better communication.

IDENTIFYING AND MEASURING TANGIBLE BENEFITS

Tangible benefits are those with a number attached to them. Some examples include:

  • Rate of absenteeism or turnover
  • Sales
  • Profits
  • Number or dollar value of returns
  • Number or percentage of customer complaints
  • Length of downtime (due to accidents, machine failure, etc.)
  • Production volume
  • Error or defect rate
  • Customer and/or employee satisfaction
  • Response time

When gathering these metrics, make sure to gather information for a few months before and a few months after the time period that you are measuring, as well as data for the same time period in years previous. You will also want to be aware of external factors that could affect your data, such economic conditions and changes in the company.

IDENTIFYING AND MEASURING INTANGIBLE BENEFITS

Training often provides more intangible benefits, such as better communication, improved anger and stress management, clearer writing skills, or more effective time management. It can be hard to put dollars and cents value on these skills; however, we are often asked to do so to prove that the training has been worthwhile.

Here are some ways to convert intangible benefits to hard numbers:

  • Calculate the time saved in hours and multiply by the person’s hourly wage
  • Tie the intangible benefit to a tangible benefit

CALCULATING TOTAL COSTS

Our next step is to determine the cost of the program. This should include:

  • Employee salaries paid while they were attending the program
  • Trainee expenses such as food, hotel, and transportation
  • Cost of materials and facility for the program
  • Facilitator cost before, during, and after the program
  • Development and licensing costs
  • Administrative costs

CONSIDERATIONS FOR MEASURING RESULTS BEFORE AND DURING TRAINING

Considerations for measuring results from training are commonly associated with actions taken after training. But have you ever taken into account what actions you can take during and even before you start your training to help you effectively measure its results?

EVALUATIONS FOR BEFORE TRAINING

Before the workshop, it can be a good idea to give participants the learning objectives and ask them how they would rate their level of knowledge with those objectives. You can even ask participants to note where they would like to be in a week, a month, and a year. It is important that participants be given a rating scale so that results are measurable.

Another useful tool is to design a pre-assignment or pre-test around the content of the course. Some ways to do this:

  • Self-analysis or supervisor analysis as discussed previously
  • Case Study
  • Reading assignment
  • Learning wish list
  • Test on prerequisite knowledge
  • Goal setting
  • Personal case studies (for example, have participants come to the class with a problem or project)

When designed properly, these pre-workshop homework assignments can accomplish a few things:

  • Get the participant in the right frame of mind for the workshop
  • Provide participants with background knowledge
  • Get participants thinking about what they want, making learning more relevant to them
  • Help you assess participants’ knowledge and needs, and target your course more accurately
  • Help you assess participants’ commitment to the course

Often, trainers may assess learning before and after training, but they may neglect to check in with trainees while they are learning. It’s very important to include this in your training plan, particularly since most training programs start with foundation concepts and build towards advanced concepts. If your trainees get lost at the beginning, your entire program could be in jeopardy.

REVIEWING LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the beginning of the program, make sure you review the learning objectives of the course with participants. Give them the opportunity to give you feedback about the objectives:

  • Are all the objectives clear?
  • Is there anything that is missing?
  • Do the objectives seem reasonable?
  • Do participants understand how these learning points can translate back to the workplace?

EVALUATIONS DURING TRAINING

During the program, check in with participants to make sure you’re still on track with the learning objectives. When participants are asked to perform evaluations, point out the connection to the learning objectives.

Asking questions during your training will also help you clarify your participants understanding and get some immediate feedback on the delivery of your training. The questions you ask can include:

  • How do participants feel about the training?
  • What has been the best thing about the training so far? The worst thing?
  • What have participants learned?
  • What would participants still like to learn?

You may also want to ask specific questions about key content points.

As stated earlier, quizzes and tests are a good way to measure how much participants are learning during the course. Mid-point tests are good in many situations, including:

  • Workshops that have a lot of content
  • Workshops with difficult content
  • Long workshops
  • Topics that depend on each other

Don’t forget that a test doesn’t have to mean an hour-long exam, but can be quick and even gamified to make it light hearted and fun.

SKILL ASSESSMENTS

Quizzes, questionnaires, and tests are great for evaluating many types of knowledge. However, you may need additional tools to evaluate changes in behavior, abilities, and attitude. Below are some tools that can help you evaluate these types of learning.

Demonstrations: Demonstrations can be a very powerful teaching tool, particularly for complex tasks. One method is to demonstrate the desired task, and then have participants demonstrate it back to you. Or, place participants in groups or pairs and have them demonstrate the task to each other while monitoring the activity.

Role Play: Role plays are often listed as participants’ least favorite part of a workshop, but they are very helpful when learning new behaviors. Conflict resolution, mediation, negotiation, communication, and training are just a few of the topics where role plays can be helpful.

To make the most of role plays, try these tips:

  • Give participants the option to take an active or inactive role.
  • Have clear instructions and roles.
  • Provide constructive feedback.
  • Provide tip sheets on the behavior to be role played.

Games: Games can provide a fun, yet educational learning experience for participants. Make sure to practice the game ahead of time and make sure that it truly helps participants practice the skill that they are learning.

Simulations: When they are well designed, simulations are excellent ways to assess how well a participant has learned a skill. They are particularly useful in situations where it is imperative that participants have excellent knowledge before going ahead with the real task, such as medical procedures or machine operation.

CONCLUSION

Are you leading a train-the-trainer program? Do you want to ensure your trainers are being proactive with evaluating the success of their training? Download our Measuring Results from Training Workshop for everything you need to teach your participants how to analyze the effectiveness of their training and improve it for future workshops.

Posted by Katelyn Roy on 

Running Your First Training Workshop? Ease your nerves with our tips and tricks

nervous man

nervous manIf you’re reading this, it means you are probably finally scheduled to conduct your first training workshop.

Or perhaps you are getting back into training after a hiatus.

Or maybe you are just looking to brush up on your training skills and confidence.

Regardless of your situation, we all get a little nervous time to time when it comes to presenting information to others. As a trainer, being the “expert” in the room can be intimidating. But it doesn’t have to be. Below are our tips and tricks for easing your nerves when running your training sessions.

Delivering Training

PREPARATION IS KEY

This may be the number one way to ease nerves when delivering your first training session. And the reality of this blog post is that many of the tips and tricks boil down to this one simple concept: preparation. By reviewing and developing training content ahead of time, we increase our familiarity with it. Familiarity decreases nerves. If you go into your training workshop with a clear and comprehensive knowledge of your content and how you want to deliver it, you will significantly reduce any fear of the unknown, because you have eliminated it. There’s no doubt that preparation for a training workshop is time consuming, and a lot of work, but it will be worth it when you are able to confidently deliver your training. And luckily, our training materials allow you to have a strong baseline for your content to jumpstart your workshops.

CONDUCT A TRAINING NEEDS ANALYSIS

Employee training is sometimes an obvious solution to fixing an organizational challenge. But ensuring you are training on the correct topics is crucial to making your workshop worthwhile. Sometimes training can be a quick and simple solution to overcoming organizational challenges, but it is important that it is done strategically and with intention. If you can understand the needs of your trainees, you can give them impactful, captivating training that you can feel confident in. Conducting a training needs analysis will help you ensure that you are deliver training that is actually conducive to fulfilling your organizational needs.

CONSIDER YOUR STRUCTURE

Structuring your training ahead of time will be your roadmap to successful training. Having an agenda for your training session can help you stay on track and even keep your trainees more engaged. By having a structure, you can provide preview statements. Preview statements let your trainees know how you will present your information overtime. An example of a preview statement is:

  • “First I will define Unconscious Bias, then we will spend ten minutes describing ways it may come up in the workplace, finally, I will go over how to create an Unconscious Bias awareness plan for your workplace.”

Making these statements using transitional words such as “First, second, third” or “Then, next, finally” and providing timelines keeps your audience in the loop on what is to come and can actually keep them more engaged throughout the training session. It also mentally prepares them to take in the information and can increase knowledge retention.

Considering your structure also means deciding what to include in your training to make it interactive. This could be through breakout rooms, gamification, quizzes, etc.

Another simple way to structure your training workshops is through asking questions. This is more than simply asking if your trainees have any questions. Consider check-up questions pertaining to the training as well. Questions could be as simple as:

  • “Has anyone ever heard the term unconscious bias before?”
  • “A few minutes ago, we went over signs of unconscious bias in the workplace. What was one of those signs?”
  • “Does anyone want to share how their last job handled unconscious bias?”

These simple knowledge checks throughout invite trainees to share their experiences and compare and contrast different ideas being taught. Starting with simple one-word questions then moving into questions that require more discussion will ease your trainees into meaningful conversation that complements your training.

BE PERSONABLE

When providing training for the first time, it can feel much easier to simply stick to the script of your training. When nerves are high, it can be intimidating to go off the path you’ve have had time to prepare and revise and feel confident in. However, being personable with your trainees, while it can require you to go a little off script, can be very helpful in building trust and rapport. It can be as simple as starting your session with some conversation. And it doesn’t even have to start with conversation on the training topics. Start by asking about their weekend, or their hobbies. Share things about yourself to contribute to the conversation and encourage them to do the same. This informal practice may seem trivial, but it accomplishes a few different things. It can open up the door to conversation and allows your trainees to feel safe talking about anything, including the training content. It also builds momentum for a conversational tone throughout the entire training session. If you make sure your trainees feel welcome to speak up at any time in the presentation, creates more engagement and allows you to get more feedback on your training. Furthermore, this eases any nerves for both the trainees and you as the trainer. By breaking the ice with these more approachable conversation topics, you can ease your way into topics relating to the training content by asking about their position in the workplace, their work experience, and how they most prefer to be trained. Making your participants comfortable with opening up in lower stakes conversations will make them more likely to open up in more advanced conversations pertaining to your training.

Another way to be more personable in your training workshops is through adding commentary to your training. If you are working off of premade training materials and PowerPoint Slides like ours, consider going beyond your reference materials to provide personal input. This could include the importance of certain parts of your training, how it may be relevant to your trainees’ roles, or personal stories of how it has impacted your professional life.

Remember, your commentary is the value you provide to the trainees. It’s the purpose of having you stand up there and deliver the training, rather than simply having everyone read the content themselves. This conversational tone is what will make your workshops memorable.

TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS

Like we said earlier, when you are delivering training to a group of employees, you are the “expert” in the room. To get to where you are, you have built some creditability and have developed a strong awareness of the topic you are training on. Despite all this, a lack of confidence in trainers is all too familiar. This can lead to imposture syndrome, which can result in underexplaining your training content due to low confidence, which will make your training less effective. Building confidence may be the most important step other than preparation in easing your nerves for your first training workshop (mind you, preparation builds confidence, so they go hand in hand).  The reality is that you are the trainer, and your input means something. Be sure to remember that going in and the confidence will grow overtime with experience.

LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES

It is crucial to give yourself grace when conducting training for the first time (or when doing anything for the first time for that matter). In your first training session – and probably in training sessions to come – there will be moments where things don’t go according to plan. Even if you have done everything listed above to help prepare you, there will still be external circumstances that may impact the delivery of your training. Once you accept this and willingly prepare to have to sometimes solve problems on the fly, you will confidently be able to deliver your training no matter what gets thrown at you. And don’t forget, feedback is your friend.

CONCLUSION

We hope this blog post has helped you feel better equipped to deliver your first training session, or ease your nerves about future training sessions.

Originally posted by Katelyn Roy on 

Hosting a Lunch and Learn? Make Sure You Review Our Checklist

Are you looking to provide training opportunities to your team in the format of a lunch and learn?

A lunch and learn is an educational training session where a topic is discussed over a lunch hour. They are generally a voluntary, more informal event where employees can engage with each other while learning something new that may help them in their organizational roles.

Lunch and learn events can feel like a hard sell. If you are going to ask your employees to take their lunch hour to listen to your training content, you want to make sure it feels worth their while. Lunch and learns should be engaging and enjoyable. And if done right, hosting a lunch and learn has the potential to improve employee satisfaction and the quality of employee training.

LUNCH AND LEARN PREPARATION CHECKLIST

Lunch and Learn Checklist

Planning a lunch and learn is a significant responsibility, so preparation is key. It can be easy to worry that you may be forgetting something. To prevent any last-minute hiccups, below is our checklist for developing an effective lunch and learn:

  • Venue: Consider where your lunch and learn will take place. Some ideas for this include the board room at the office, a restaurant, or a hotel conference room. If you are hosting an online lunch and learn, prepare your setup through a service like Zoom or Microsoft Teams.
  • Catering: It is not a lunch and learn without the lunch! Make sure you make arrangements for catering your lunch and learn well in advance. If you are hosting an online lunch and learn, arranging the lunch part of that equation may seem complicated. But it doesn’t have to be. With countless online food delivery services, you can deliver food to your team’s locations, or allow your employees to order food and reimburse them. While you can also opt to simply ask everyone to bring their own lunch to your lunch and learn, providing food may help you get more attendees and make your event more enjoyable.
  • Topics Discussed: It is imperative that you choose the right topic for your lunch and learn. Complex or formal instruction is probably not suitable. Choose a topic that can be covered in a short period of time. For example, email etiquette or a vendor presentation would be useful in a lunch and learn setting. Introducing a new method of production would probably not be effective for lunch and learns. Your lunch and learn topic should be focused and concise, since you will only have about an hour to convey all of your content. When deciding on your topic, consider the priorities and challenges in your organization at this time, an develop topic ideas that address them. Are you teaching more technical skills, such as the implementation of a new software in your company? Or are you looking to increase your employees’ soft skills? These are the questions to ask when developing your topic. Since lunch and learn events are particularly brief, you want to ensure your topics are engaging and make sense for a more informal environment. This is why lunch and learns are best for training on manageable topics such as:
  • Business etiquette
  • Email etiquette
  • Social media
  • Managing change
  • Team buildingBasically, any topics that are light, relevant, and engaging, while also being able to deliver information in a short-format presentation.
  • Developing Content: Lunch and learns are more than social activities. They are used to convey important information, which is why you cannot underestimate the importance of the content. The content that you use should be focused and relevant. It should also be informal and interactive to better engage your audience.
  • Audio Visual Equipment: Consider how you will be delivering your content. If you plan on having visuals such as PowerPoint slides, ensure you have a plan regarding how you will work out the technical components of your lunch and learn. Arrange to have your projector set up with your slides and if you need audio be sure to arrange to have a mic set up before you present your content.
  • Marketing Materials: Do you have marketing materials you want implemented into your lunch and learn? Perhaps you want to display your company banners, or provide swag to your team. Be sure to have any marketing components for your lunch and learn prepared and set up ahead of time.
  • Distribution of Materials: When presenting a lunch and learn (or any training for that matter), you need to consider the subject of take away material. What will you provide? What type of follow up will be necessary? Take away materials include handouts, quizzes, self-tests, websites, reference materials, and white papers. Your topic will determine what materials you need to provide. Always prepare your materials ahead of time.Handouts are useful tools that allow the participants to follow along with the presentation and take notes. Taking notes helps participants engage with the material on a personal level. It is important, however, to make sure that handouts are focused and not filled with too much information. Handouts are supplementary material. They should not provide all the information in your presentation or people will simply read ahead and not pay attention. Consider the following for creating and distributing handouts:
  • Basic points
  • Room for notes
  • Interesting graphicsWhen you create take away material, make sure to review it carefully. You do not want to send out the wrong information. Include your contact information in the handouts, and make more than enough copies for your class.
  • Advertising: It’s not an effective lunch and learn if your turnout is underwhelming. Give everyone plenty of advance (about 2-3 weeks) so they can adjust their schedules and plan their tasks accordingly. Inform your team of your lunch and learn via email calendar requests (this allows you to get an easy RSVP), posters in common areas, and even word of mouth around the office. When advertising your lunch and learn, focus on the impact and value of attending it, and don’t forget to mention any incentive for going (like a free meal). 

Conclusion

We hope this checklist can help you effectively prepare for your next lunch and learn. Are you looking to train your team on putting on lunch and learn events? Check out our Developing a Lunch and Learn Workshop for everything you need to train on lunch and learn events.

Originally Posted by Katelyn Roy on 

YOUR QUICK GUIDE TO ANGER MANAGEMENT IN THE WORKPLACE

Angry Man
Angry Man

As a Courseware Developer, Maria Eagles identifies the needs of trainers and designs/creates training and development programs accordingly.

In this week’s blog post, she gives us her quick guide to
anger management in the workplace.
Corporate Training Materials

Anger is complex and often a misunderstood emotion that goes beyond simply being mad. Anger is a natural response that follows a pattern of phases, and can transpire from many factors, including other hidden emotions.

Anger Management training in the workplace can help employees increase their self-awareness and self-management when it comes to anger. This can positively contribute to employee morale, conflict resolution, and creating an overall improved workplace culture.

MYTH BUSTING: COMMON MYTHS ABOUT ANGER, DEBUNKED

Anger in a complicated emotions that brings up many different associations and assumptions in people’s minds. For clarity, below is some common myths about anger, debunked:

  • “Anger needs to be ‘unleashed’ for it to go away.” – It’s true that anger needs to be expressed to relieve symptoms. However, expressing anger in verbally or physically aggressive ways is not the only way to ‘unleash’ anger. Nor is anger an excuse for a person to be aggressive. The expression of anger can be tempered by rationality and forethought. Venting anger does not necessarily result in the anger disappearing, although venting can relieve the symptoms. At times, processing personal experiences, seeing concrete change and genuine forgiveness are needed for anger to go away.
  • “Ignoring anger will make it go away.” – Generally, all kinds of emotions do not disappear when ignored. The anger just gets temporarily shelved, and will likely find other ways of getting expressed. It can get projected to another person, transformed into a physical symptom, or built up for a bigger future blow up. Some of our behaviors may even be unconscious ways of expressing anger. While there are situations when it’s inadvisable to express your anger immediately, the very least you can do is acknowledge that it exists.
  • “You can’t control your anger.” – This myth is related to the second one. As discussed earlier, the fight and flight instinct can make anger an overwhelming emotion. However, this instinct does not mean that you’re but a slave to your impulses. Awareness of anger dynamics and a conscious effort to rise above your anger can help you regain control of your reactions.
  • “If I don’t get angry, people will think I am a pushover.”’- It’s true that a person can lose credibility if they make rules and then ignores violations. However, anger is not the only way a person can show that there are consequences to violations. In fact, the most effective way of instilling discipline in others is to have a calm, non-emotional approach to dealing with rule-breakers. Calm and rationality can communicate strength too.GETTING TO THE ROOT OF THE ANGER

Anger is a normal response that is often experienced as a secondary emotion. This concept can be represented with the Anger Iceberg. The Anger Iceberg illustrates the idea that emotional reactions are not always one-dimensional, rather there are many hidden causes. Although anger may be presented and expressed on the outside, there are other underlying emotions that give energy to this anger.

Emotions that frequently prompt anger include:

  • Frustration – When a goal is blocked from reaching the desired result, individuals will become frustrated. This frustration will provoke anger as an emotional response, directed at the object recognized as the cause of the frustration.
  • Hurt/Loss – Individuals will turn to anger, as a substitute to feeling pain. Anger is a normal stage during a grieving process. This can be done consciously, or unconsciously.
  • Disrespected – This occurs when individuals are not given the respect that they deserve, or feel that they are always under attack.
  • Fear – Fear and anger derive from feelings of control; while fear will typically arise from a loss of control, anger is a means of gaining back control.
  • Shame – Anger is used as a defense response when individuals perceive they are being humiliated, criticized, or rejected. Anger is a way to distract us from feelings of shame.
  • Guilt – Reacting with anger is used as a way to protect our ego, and remove ourselves from the blame. Unfortunately, this means that blame is taken from within and placed on another individual.
  • Sadness – When we feel sad, we feel vulnerable and as though we have loss of control. To avoid these feelings of sadness, we will subconsciously shift into an anger mode to mask feelings of disappointment or discouragement.

Anger: Understanding the Cycle

Anger is a natural emotion that usually stems from perceived threat or loss. It’s a pervasive emotion; it affects our body, thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Anger is often described in terms of its intensity, frequency, duration, threshold, and expression.

Anger typically follows a predictable pattern: a cycle. Understanding the cycle of anger can help us understand our own anger reactions, and those of others. It can also help us in considering the most appropriate response.

  1. The Trigger Phase

The trigger phase happens when we perceive a threat or loss, and our body prepares to respond. In this phase, there is a subtle change from an individual’s normal/adaptive state into a stressed state. Anger triggers differ from person to person, and can come from both the environment or from our thought processes.

  1. The Escalation Phase

In the escalation phase, there is the progressive appearance of the anger response. In this phase, our body prepares for a crisis after perceiving the trigger. This preparation is mostly physical, and is manifested through symptoms like rapid breathing, increased heart rate, and raised blood pressure. Once the escalation phase is reached there is less chance of calming down, as this is the phase where the body prepares for fight or flight.

  1. The Crisis Phase

As previously mentioned, the escalation phase is progressive, and it is in the crisis phase that the anger reaction reaches its peak. In the crisis phase our body is on full alert, prepared to take action in response to the trigger. During this phase, logic and rationality may be limited, if not impaired because the anger instinct takes over. In extreme cases, the crisis phase means that a person may be a serious danger to himself or to other people.

  1. The Recovery Phase

The recovery phase happens when the anger has been spent, or at least controlled, and there is now a steady return to a person’s normal/ adaptive state. In this stage, reasoning and awareness of one’s self returns. If the right intervention is applied, the return to normalcy progresses smoothly. However, an inappropriate intervention can reignite the anger and serve as a new trigger.

  1. The Depression Phase

The depression phase marks a return to a person’s normal/ adaptive ways. Physically, this stage marks below normal vital signs, such as heart rate, so that the body can recover equilibrium. A person’s full use of his faculties return at this point, and the new awareness helps a person assess what just occurred. Consequently, this stage may be marked by embarrassment, guilt, regret, and or depression.

After the depression phase is a return to a normal or adaptive phase. A new trigger, however, can start the entire cycle all over again. Some people also skip certain phases, or else they go through them privately and/ or unconsciously.

CONTROLLING ANGER: ACTIONABLE STEPS

Since anger is an instinctive emotion that comes unbidden, we often do not have a choice in whether we would be angry or not. What we can do however, is take control of our anger when it comes. Anger management is not about suppressing your feelings of anger, but rather to find meaning behind your anger and determine healthy ways to express this anger. Uncontrolled anger can be extremely problematic; thus, it is important to find strategies to keep anger in check. The more you practice the strategies of gaining control over your anger, the easier it will become.

Relaxation techniques to control anger include:

  • Breathing Exercises – Deliberately controlling your breathing can help a person calm down. Ways to do this include: breathing through one’s nose and exhaling through one’s mouth, breathing from one’s diagram, and breathing rhythmically.
  • Meditation – Meditation is a way of exercising mental discipline. Most meditation techniques involve increasing self-awareness, monitoring thoughts, and focusing. Meditation techniques include prayer, the repetition of a mantra, and relaxing movement or postures.
  • Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) – PMR is a technique of stress management that involves mentally inducing your muscles to tense and relax. PMR usually focuses on areas of the body where tension is commonly felt, such as the head, shoulders, and chest area. It’s a way to exercise the power of the mind over the body.
  • Visualization – Visualization is the use of mental imagery to induce relaxation. Some visualization exercise involves picturing a place of serenity and comfort, such as a beach or a garden. Other visualization exercises involve imagining the release of anger in a metaphorical form. An example of this latter kind of visualization is imagining one’s anger as a ball to be released to space.
  • Music – Some people find listening to music as very relaxing. The kind of music that’s calming differs from person to person; traditional relaxation music includes classical pieces, acoustic sounds, and even ambient noises.
  • Art and Crafts – There are people who find working with their hands as a good way to relax. This is especially true for people who feel their tensions in their hands. Drawing pictures, paper construction and sculpting are just some of the ways to de-stress when faced with an anger trigger. Arts and crafts are helpful because it keeps a person from obsessing on the anger while he or she is still in the recovery phase of the anger cycle.

CONCLUSION

Anger management is a process. It is impossible to remove anger out of our lives, but it is possible to find healthy outlets for this anger. Anger management involves being informed, self-awareness, taking control, and taking action. These changes take time and practice, however when you stay motivated with controlling your anger, you will have powerful, positive outcomes.

Did you enjoy our anger management quick guide? We’ve just updated our Anger Management course, making it more relevant than ever for your participants. There’s no better time to tackle anger management training in your organization. Learn more about this course or get started on your corporate training today.